FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

August 28, 1973

 

Release # 73-017

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. --The Consumer Product Safety Commission today banned nine additional aerosol spray adhesives as "presenting an imminent hazard" to the public. The Commission's action follows last week's ban of four other aerosol spray glues which have been possibly linked to chromosome breakage and resulting severe multiple birth defects.

Eight of the spray adhesives are manufactured by the 3-M Company, St. Paul, Minnesota. One is manufactured by the Borden Company, Columbus, Ohio.

All nine aerosol spray adhesives banned today are based on the same or similar chemical formulations of the original four spray adhesives banned by the Commission last week.

The nine spray adhesives banned today are:

Manufactured by 3-M:

- "Sears Multi-Purpose Spray Adhesive"

- "Scotch Brand Multi-Purpose Spray Adhesive"

- "Scotch-Grip Brand Floral Adhesive 77"

- "3-M Brand Shipping Mate Palletizing Adhesive"

- "3-M Brand Spray Trim Adhesive"

- "Tuff-Bond Spray-Hesive"

- "Bear Brand Spray Trim Adhesive"

- "Tri Chem Spray Mist Adhesive"

Manufactured by Borden:

- "Marshall's Photo-Mount Spray Adhesive"

CPSC Chairman Richard O. Simpson said that both companies had moved immediately to discontinue the production and distribution of the aerosol sprays. And he said that Sears, Roebuck and Co., had voluntarily discontinued sale of their privately-labeled spray.

"But," Simpson explained, "the Commission felt it was necessary to officially declare these additional aerosol spray adhesives 'banned hazardous substances' to assure that sales of the products are immediately halted."

Simpson said that retailers are subject to civil and criminal penalties for continued sales. And he said that the Commission has undertaken a nationwide sampling of retail outlets to locate stores which may still have these products on sale.

Simpson said that the Commission is directing an intensive research program to attempt to identify and isolate the problems associated with the spray adhesives. But, he said that the nature of the problem will prevent an early answer.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission also reaffirmed its recommendation to consumers to discontinue the use of all aerosol spray adhesives. The action was based on findings by a University of Oklahoma researcher, possibly linking aerosol spray adhesives to chromosome damage and resulting multiple birth defects.

Last week the Commission banned:
 

- "Foil Art Adhesive," manufactured by the 3-M Company

- "Scotch Brand Spra-Ment Adhesive," manufactured by the 3-M Company

- "3-M Brand Spray Adhesive 77," manufactured by the 3-M Company

- "Krylon Spray manufactured by Borden Company

Yesterday, the Commission issued recommendations of a panel of medical experts to persons who may been exposed aerosol spray adhesives.