Safety Recall Announced For Exer-Climber, Promo-Stepper

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:

May 14, 1991

(301) 504-7908

Release # 91-065

 

Safety Recall Announced For Exer-Climber, Promo-Stepper

WASHINGTON, DC -- Dynamic Classics, Ltd. of Saddlebrook, NJ, in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), announced a free retrofit program for its spring exerciser called either the "Exer-Climber" or the "Promo- Stepper." The springs of some 35,000 exercisers sold nationwide from April 1989 through December 1990 may break during use and result in serious foot injuries. The firm has notified CPSC of 82 such injuries. The injuries occurred when the spring broke and part of the spring struck the user's foot, resulting in bruises, lacerations and fractures.

The exercisers are a stair-climber type device consisting of two springs, each attached to a black foot pedal and mounted to a metal A-frame. Black or white metal tubular sections and a foam-padded handle are additional parts provided for consumers to assemble the A-frame exercisers. The unassembled products were sold in stores nationwide. The retail price was approximately $45.00.

Dynamic Classics is alerting consumers to correct their exercisers with a free retrofit kit being offered by the firm. The kit provides springs with metal brackets on each end to prevent over-stressing and breaking of the end loops of the springs. Exer-Climbers and Promo-Steppers with the metal brackets attached to both ends of the springs do not require the corrective kit.

Consumers should immediately discontinue using Exer- Climbers and Promo-Steppers without metal brackets attached to the ends of the springs. The products should not be used until the springs are replaced with the retrofit kit. Consumers should call Dynamic Classics, Ltd. toll-free at 1-800-284-8492 to receive a free retrofit kit. Consumers may also write to: Dynamic Classics, Ltd., 95 Mayhill Street, Saddlebrook, NJ 07662.

Consumers who have an exerciser without metal brackets attached to the ends of the springs, and who do not wish to use or repair it should destroy the exerciser so that no one else may use it and risk injury. The exercisers manufactured after June 1990 have been corrected to prevent breakage.

The CPSC was established in 1972 as the Federal agency responsible for product safety. The CPSC is commissioned to protect the public from unreasonable risks of injury and death associated with consumer products. Some 15,000 different kinds of consumer products fall within the Commission's jurisdiction and each year these products are involved in an estimated 29 million injuries and 22,000 deaths.